It’s lovely to have recently returned to the School of Healthcare, University of Leeds where I completed by PhD back in 2011. I have always looked back at my time in the Baines Wing with affection and it feels full circle to be back here working on another exciting project. This time I am working part-time as a Research Fellow on Professor Liz Hughes NIHR funded project “The Effectiveness of Sexual Assault Referral Centres with regard to Mental Health and Substance Use: A National Mixed Method Study” which is due for completion in May 2021. You can learn more about the project by visiting the Mimos website.

Alongside this post I am continuing my role as Researcher at Saint Mary’s Sexual Assault Referral Centre in Manchester where I have been working since 2015. As part of my Saint Mary’s SARC role, I was involved in the recent publication ‘The high prevalence of pre-existing mental health complaints in clients attending Saint Mary’s Sexual Assault Referral Centre: Implications for initial management and engagement with the Independent Sexual Violence Advisor service at the centre.’

The key findings were:

  • Prevalence of self-reported pre-existing mental health complaints in Saint Mary’s Centre adult clients was very high at 69% – the national average is 16 (McManus and colleagues, 2016)
  • Depression and anxiety accounted for most of these mental health complaints
  • Clients with mental health complaints took longer to present to the Saint Mary’s Centre than those without, although there was no difference in the long-term engagement with the Independent Sexual Violence Advisor service at the Centre between the two groups

The findings from this work demonstrate the need for the Mimos study. Being involved in this prevalence work at Saint Mary’s SARC was the catalyst for my involvement with the Mimos study.

Rabiya Majeed-Ariss is a Research Fellow at the University of Leeds and Researcher at St Mary’s Sexual Assault Referral Centre in Manchester. You can contact Rabiya here or directly, and you can follow her @r_majeedariss or on ResearchGate.

References

McManus and colleagues (2016) Mental Health and Wellbeing in England: Adult Psychiatric Morbidity Survey 2014, NHS Digital, Leeds.

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